First Take Analysis: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization

Today marks yet another important era in Facebook’s saga, they are expected to make a big push to extend the Facebook experience to every webpage.

Today, I attended the f8 developer conference hosted by Facebook, they’ve made some key announcements on what they want their developers to do.  While there’s a lot of news sources and bloggers rehashing what was announced, I’d like to go a step deeper and talk about the ecosystem impacts, opportunities and threats, and provide some insights.  Here’s my take:

Matrix: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
I just finished watching the keynote, while there’s a lot of folks rehashing news, my goal is to tell you what it means, and the impacts it has.

Announcement What It Is Opportunities Threats What No One Tells You
Graph API An open protocol that’s designed to aggregate all social activities from your friend back to Facebook This makes Facebook a social inbox, regardless of the service: Pandora, Yelp, your corporate site Email providers like Gmail/Buzz, Microsoft Windows Live, Yahoo, and AOL all want to be those destinations, now competing with 500mm users in FB Facebook wants to be the starting point for your world –the new email inbox. If they turn on advanced search tools, this can threaten google.com
Social Plugins: “Like” button Allows website managers to quickly embed ‘like’ feature on website, like other social features. This will aggregate on FB, and is a form of social bookmarks As users go to websites (Like CNN) they can see which one of their real friends like which article. Now your friends are the editors, threatening traditional editorial process. Threat to social bookmarking tools like Delicious All this social aggregated content will yield a powerful database of what you and your friends like, the precursor to customized web experiences and social advertising.
Social Plugins: “Social Bar” A floating bar at the bottom of a webpage embedded by simple code allows for EVERY page to be quickly social. Everywhere you go online your friends can be with you, forever connected Google Side Wiki,Meebo, and Liveworld’s Livebar (unless they both integrate Facebook FB API). Disclosure: Liveworld is a client Now as every page can be social, there is no reason for consumers to make buying mistakes –their friends opinions are always there, diminishing power of marketers.
Docs.com A partnership with Microsoft that allows Microsoft office docs to now be social with your Facebook friend This can extend collaboration with your friends to the office environment Unsure if this use case makes sense, are your friends those you want to collaborate with? This is a direct threat to Google Docs Facebook and Microsoft are in bed, to team up against Google. Expect advertising based on social context to appear soon.
“Presence” Location based data Facebook handed out in every attendees page an RFID tag that allows you to swipe it at kiosks to indicate your locations, see mine. Although experimental expect this to extend to location base applications, eventually tying into credit cards, and mobile devices Location based social networks like Yelp, Gowalla, MyTown, Foursquare and Twitter already allow people to do this –the difference?  Add these chips to physical objects Expect this technology to extend to mobile phones, credit cards, and future consumer products –allowing for unique social interactions.

War Horn Sounded For Developers To Spread Facebook Experience:

  • A Precursor to Social CRM. All of the social data that is now being aggregated to Facebook is the foundation for Social CRM.  As Facebook captures each  ‘object’ whether it be a song, restaurant, person, or ‘like’ they are now assigning a Facebook ID (primary key).  This unique identifier will allow every person, object, and piece of media to be trackable and have associated metadata.  In the future, expect these objects to be used by developers to quickly assemble experience in context, right on the fly.
  • Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs. Corporate websites are plagued with inflexible archaic content management systems. Rather than wait for IT to develop a social roadmap for the corporate website, brands can now embed Facebook social features on corporate sites, serving up interaction and allowing users to find content their friends also like.  Yet beware, by allowing Facebook to be the primary login, this reduces the traditional way of capturing leads and populating your database.  Secondly, by doing this once, you’re setting the promise that Facebook will always be part of our corporate experience.
  • Facebook goes more public, and threatens Google –but users may revolt. Facebook’s roaring growth is a threat to Google and other web portals, and as more developers deploy these hooks, they spread their colonies all over the internet.  Yet Facebook’s core conundrum is they’ve made the promise to their users to keep the experience private and closed. Expect continued scrutiny over privacy as Facebook struggles to go open to compete with Google, dragging along users to be more public every step of the way.   Facebook’s battles are both external as well as internal.


Above: I spoke with WSJ Digits Video Show, you’ll find me just after 6 minutes in, and also shared quotes in LATimes, NYT, SF Chronicle, San Jose Mercury, Computerworld, BBC, MacWorld, Mediapost and others

433 Replies to “First Take Analysis: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization”

  1. Pingback: | Marketing Welten
  2. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening in the warp speed of social media advancements. Phew! You rock, mister!!

  3. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  4. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  5. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  6. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  7. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  8. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  9. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  10. You are such an educator! I appreciate the thorough overview in this post and others to help me sort out what's happening at warp speed in the realm of social media advancements. Phew! It's hard to keep up but you help make it possible. You rock, mister!!

  11. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  12. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  13. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  14. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  15. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  16. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  17. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  18. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  19. So it sounds like one step closer to the “social media like air” concept where we get away from walled gardens and everything becomes more syndicated and distributed. Why am I excited and yet somewhat overwhelmed by that thought all at the same time!

  20. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  21. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  22. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  23. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  24. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  25. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  26. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  27. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  28. I'm wondering, would websites with social capabilities give away their user data base in order to be into social graph?

    Is that an opportunity for sites, or just will lower their value by giving it to Facebook?

  29. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  30. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  31. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  32. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  33. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  34. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  35. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  36. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  37. Great post JO! This new layer of interconnectivity based on social networks as opposed to content across the web does certainly change the role of all three – users, content providers/distributors and marketers.

    This also raises an interesting challenge of managing profiles – my personal profile and professional profiles as in some cases we would prefer these networks to be totally separate.

    The best part of any social initiative is that ultimately it is the crowd that decides!

  38. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  39. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  40. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  41. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  42. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  43. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  44. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  45. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  46. To the question of sharing docs between “friends”, I think there is a substantial opportunity in the non-business world. Sports leagues sharing schedules/rosters/directions, cooking clubs sharing recipes, book clubs sharing book reviews, collaborating on group homework projects for school, car enthusiasts sharing how-to service and mod guides, etc.

    There's still a need for stronger/clearer segmentation of subgroups of friends with different sharing/visibility/collaboration characteristics to make this truly useful, but it's s start.

  47. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  48. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  49. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  50. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  51. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  52. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  53. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  54. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  55. Great post. A clear and concise recap of some truly astounding developments with Facebook and the evolution of the internet as a whole. I think your comments about the conundrum that Facebook and Facebook users face over issues of privacy is the biggest issue of all and will certainly be interesting to watch. Going from a closed network of friends to an open network protocol where personal information is easily stored and accessed is quite a change indeed. The long-term implications could be a shift from “searching” for information on the web, to having it served up directly to you based upon your FB open graph. That's quite a different experience, and one that would require a very open mindset in regards to privacy issues indeed.

  56. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  57. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  58. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  59. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  60. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  61. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  62. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  63. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  64. Jeremiah, great summary. Two questions:

    1. I saw you added RFID to the list. I get location-based services, but do you see RFID as a critical technology? I was involved pretty heavy with RFID and feel like it's still not really a cost effective solution to the problem(s) it's tried to solve. Walmart and others are still in search of the 5-cent tag.

    2. Docs is interesting and certainly this seems to be another “the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend” partnership. But in the open web, do you see Docs' use of Silverlight as a negative to adoption/use? Will FB start to rally around Silverlight v. Flash or HTML5 (the only actual open standard)?

  65. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  66. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  67. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  68. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  69. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  70. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  71. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  72. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  73. Excellent analysis, as always. Thanks for sharing your insight, and welcome to the brave new (Facebook) world.

  74. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook.

  75. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  76. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  77. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  78. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  79. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  80. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  81. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  82. 1) RFID makes sense for physical objects, but for people, not so much. Why? they can checkin with their mobile device.

    2) Don't forget that MS is an investor in Facebook. Regarding the RIA apps, that's hard to tell, too early.

  83. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  84. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  85. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  86. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  87. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  88. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  89. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  90. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  91. With announcements coming fast and furious it's getting hard to keep up. Thanks for the insights. Right now I think that all of the major players are a threat to each other. When you think back just a few short years it looked like My Space was going to be a major player. Now, they barely even register in any discussion like this one. I wouldn't want to bet on any one company at this point. Keep up the good work with your prompt and very interesting analysis.

  92. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  93. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  94. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  95. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  96. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  97. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  98. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  99. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  100. Nice summary! I think the graph API is the most powerful thing here. The rest is interesting for smaller publishers but not all big sites will readily integrate Facebook likes and toolbars. I wonder whether Microsoft paid them for docs.com – that doesn't flow as well as the rest. Congrats to facebook though. Together with aapl they have a lot of momentum right now

  101. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  102. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  103. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  104. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  105. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  106. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  107. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  108. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  109. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there's a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I'm still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there.
    One question – a lot of this is content based – still pretty light if you ask me. Do you see a day when a FB ID/profile is leveraged to conduct transactions (perhaps with credits), send and receive value across the web, start a car (ok, far out)? Interesting to consider how far this goes.

  110. Самому начали приходить 3-4 спамокомментария после 15-16 июля, причем точь-в-точь, как у автора.

  111. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  112. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  113. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  114. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  115. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  116. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  117. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  118. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  119. How does this affect actual business? Outside of the FB-Google battle? What does it mean to us, mortal marketeers, except for what you pointed above? How do businesses cope with this, both b2c and b2b?

  120. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  121. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  122. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  123. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  124. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  125. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  126. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  127. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  128. Sandra

    This forces Marketers with the decision if they want to enable Facebook features on their corporate website and microsite. The good news is, I've already mapped out a maturity roadmap, (But it doesn't yet include these new announcements)

    It's here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/01/r

    And here
    http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/03/28/m

    Don't deploy all these Facebook features that were recently announced before fully understanding the ramifications of each. For example, brands that put just the “Follow me on Twitter” chicklet on their corporate website may be doing more harm than good. Do an analysis.

  129. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  130. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  131. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  132. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  133. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  134. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  135. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  136. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  137. Thanks for this summary Jeremiah, as always very helpful.

    What are your thoughts about the implications for Facebook Fan Pages. Are they going away? Going to be used differently? We have a network for 3000+ stores that we are trying to help in the social space and were implementing Fan pages as a way to engage with their consumers. Do you feel this has moved away to through their website (if they have one) instead?

    Thanks again!
    Josh

  138. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  139. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  140. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  141. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  142. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  143. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  144. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  145. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  146. pardon my ignorance – and your post almost gets me to the point of clarity – but how is this different than my reading an article on huffpost then sharing it on facebook? when i do that all my friends (and others) see what i have read and then the article resides on my profile page under “my links” – sorry to sound like i've just stepped out of kindergarten on this – thanks

  147. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  148. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  149. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  150. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  151. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  152. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  153. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  154. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  155. No worries Steve, did you know that HuffPo allows those who use FB connect to have a customized view based on their friends interests? Now, Facebook is rolling this out to a broader segment of websites.

    Also, they are trying to ask developers to use their social graph as *the* social graph, it's a data play, that's new.

    The other items like Microsoft partnership, with docs.com that's bigger than it looks.

  156. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  157. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  158. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  159. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  160. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  161. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  162. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  163. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  164. And you're doing it very well. As an oldtimer newcomer (how's that for an oxymoron? LOL), it's comforting to have the true pros doing some of the sorting. Most grateful!!

  165. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  166. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  167. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  168. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  169. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  170. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  171. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  172. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  173. Very nice analysis Jeremiah! I think we could all see yesterday the boldness and implications of the features presented at f8. I'm very interested to see how much adoption and colonization Facebook can get. The kind of control and influence over the future of the net they could have is scary. Whether they abuse or misuse the power is another issue. But the bold steps they are taking and the thought of the even bolder steps they could potentially take in the future is scary.

  174. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  175. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  176. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  177. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  178. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  179. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  180. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  181. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  182. The “Evil Empire” aspects of colonization, reducing openness of lead capture, open data, and committing to a permanent contract with Facebook is more like a indentured servitude contract than a fair and transparent relationship.

  183. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  184. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  185. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  186. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  187. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  188. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  189. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  190. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  191. Wonderful and very helpful post. Thank you for your structured anlalysis – I will share it with my clients and others.

  192. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me with I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  193. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  194. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  195. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  196. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  197. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  198. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  199. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  200. Great analysis/breakdown Jeremiah. Made me wish I read your post before posting my own reaction — Facebook turns LIKE into the new L-Word ( http://markevertz.com/archives/271 ), but still somewhat wigged about Facebook's Intergalactic play. Would love your thoughts on the true downside of all of this from a user perspective (glut of online ads now forced upon you in previous “safe havens' like your mobile phone and gated Facebook communities of friends and family– all based on preferences. Am I right to be spooked or completely off the mark?
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    Mark

  201. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  202. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  203. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  204. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  205. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  206. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  207. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  208. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  209. The subject is: Facebook’s Crusade of Colonization
    Facebook Announces any changes and i thing they gonna be well……..
    1.Graph API
    2.Social Plugins: “Like” button
    3.Social Plugins: “Social Bar”

    i will like these changes.

    student aid

  210. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  211. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  212. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  213. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  214. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  215. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  216. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  217. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  218. Jeremiah, this is a great post. There is much debate happening on this very topic. We all understand that at the end of the day everyone including FB is looking to make a dollar. What started out as a great site to stay connected with your friends, co-workers, etc. has now gone corporate. Whether you want to except it or not this is the master plan with the powers of B. I don't hold this against them as we all enjoy free enterprise. However, they are compromising without care what their users want. The like as you mention is another way individuals are tracked in day to day activities. Everyone should have the option of using FB new method, whether this is your personal or business page. At what point do we stop being a number and get back to being social and not sold out to corporate America.

  219. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  220. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  221. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  222. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  223. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  224. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  225. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  226. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  227. Interesting that you use the terminology “colonization” I think you have raised a very interesting concept. Perhaps that is exactly what is happening on the Internet…. colonization.

  228. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  229. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  230. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  231. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  232. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  233. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  234. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  235. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  236. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  237. Jeremiah – about your bullet point “Corporate websites can now be social –yet beware the tradeoffs.”

    That is a really important point that corporate IT departments will ignore at their own peril.

    If corporate IT through action or omission gives Facebook control over designing and managing the architecture for an extended social CRM infrastructure, the impacts will not be unlike those felt by companies that outsourced so much of their IT departments that they end up letting vendors dictate their business strategies. Especially in highly competitive markets, I see the possibility that adopting the Facebook architecture and standards could make branding and market differentiation much more difficult.

  238. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  239. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  240. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  241. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  242. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  243. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  244. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  245. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  246. Thanks much. This is extremely useful. I'm focused on the social marketing aspects—your assessment that the “social bar” will “diminish the power of marketers.” What I see happening more and more is that good marketers—good digital agencies, particularly—are working on what I'm calling the crowdsourcing of marketing, which is part of the crowdsourcing of everything from news to politics to books to… The simplest examples of crowdsourced marketing involve attracting fans of a brand to a Facebook site or any number of other places and then recruiting them to recommend the brand to their friends. Crowdsourced marketing, of course, is much more influential than traditional brand marketing because it uses the voices that have the greatest influence on purchase behavior—friends' voices. (See this 2009 study from Nielsen – http://bit.ly/9rSpU0 ) So it's not clear that this particular move by Facebook will further diminish marketers' power. It's another step down a road where brands no longer own their fates; rather, they co-own their fates with the people who use, love and hate the brands. But we've been headed down that road for a while.

  247. Thanks very much for sharing.
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  248. I'm fascinated by this entire article, but why does it strike me as ironic that there's the Facebook “like” button right underneath, along with all their other ones…. <_<

  249. I'm fascinated by this entire article, but why does it strike me as ironic that there's the Facebook “like” button right underneath, along with all their other ones…. <_<

  250. Thanks Jeremiah – great post, you did exactly what you intended, added signal through the noise (there’s a lot of it out there) with actionable, solid info. Now to figure out what that actionable plan will be – I’m still chewing on how to best take advantage and to leverage these developments to put our product out there

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