6 things I’ve learned since becoming an analyst

I really owe it to you to continue to live and work as transparently as possible, this is after all, what I preach. It starts with me first sharing, so here goes. The last month has been a whirlwind, I’ve traveled from SFO > Boston > Chicago > SFO > Boston with a quick trip to NY met hundreds of people, even more photos, and I’m just getting started. I’ve officially been an analyst for 31 days, and it’s time to take a look back, here’s what I’ve learned: 1) I’ve a lot to learn I was in training for three weeks, (well I missed most of the second week at a conference) to learn some very rigorous methodology, meet … Continue reading6 things I’ve learned since becoming an analyst

Weekly Digest of the Social Networking Space: Oct 31, 2007

Big Update: You can subscribe to this digest tag only, which filters only these type of posts. I’m confident I’ll earn your trust, deliver value and you’ll visit my blog anyways. I’m respecting your limited time by publishing this weekly summary, it’s great to send to busy executives. I’ve created a new category called Digest where you can start to track and access these going forward. The hope? To make it easy for a web strategist to quickly scan the activity in the last week. I strive to make headlines on items categorized and succinct. Need to make decisions about your web strategy? I’m here to help: subscribe to my blog, sign up for emails (right nav), follow me on … Continue readingWeekly Digest of the Social Networking Space: Oct 31, 2007

The many mediums of the Web Strategy Community (50 replies from one tweet)

I posted one Tweet on Twitter and recieved about 50 back in return. I now have a pretty good idea of how my network (my community, the web strategy community) communicates. From who? From the pebble people. What’s a pebble? They’re often first generation adopters. they are followed by swimmers, surfers and others. Most of the people in Twitter fall into one of those three categories, they’re early adopters, tech influencers, and what Forrester calls “creators”. I tweeted this question: “@everyone quick, count the many tools you’ve communicated over today. Twitter, FB, blog, email (personal and work), phone, cell =7” Two hours later, I had quite a few responses (nearly 50) I’ve removed any private tweets (at least 5), all … Continue readingThe many mediums of the Web Strategy Community (50 replies from one tweet)

How should you allocate your web strategy budget for 2008?

Update: What better way to kickstart the conversation by using my real voice? Listen in. It’s planning time, and many of you have submitted your strategies, budgets and resource requests to management, how do I know? Because I get tons of emails, facebook messages, and formal emails at work requesting advice and guidance. Recently, I posted a question to Ian, who’s the CEO of an internet marketing firm in Seattle: [What’s the best way to balance a diverse web marketing budget? How should I allocate my funds? How do I prioritize, there are so many tools to consider!] In his response, He’s broken it down by type of company . Ian lays it down, while some may find it dangerous … Continue readingHow should you allocate your web strategy budget for 2008?

Social Graph for the Workplace: A discussion hosted by Visible Path

I spoke at Visible Path’s (client) Corporate Social Network Design Council in San Francisco today. The panel, moderated by Anneke Seley Founder & CEO, PhoneWorks, included Anthony Lye, SVP of Oracle CRM, Ross Mayfield of Social Text, and Matt, the program manager of Motorola’s Internet and Collaboration Technology. Highlights of the discussion: -Initially, when the web was launched, it was estimated that business folks were separated by 7 degrees, now it can be measured at nearly 3 degrees -Ross suggested that every brand will have a wiki associated with them. Take for example “lost” which has a handful of wikis, both from corporate and the fan base -The big question of how do personal and professional networks become both a … Continue readingSocial Graph for the Workplace: A discussion hosted by Visible Path

Videos of Consumer Forum: Richard Edelman, Christie Hefner (Playboy), Christina Norman CMO of MTV, Ze Frank, Charlene Li, Josh Bernoff, Henry Jenkins and Pud!

The summarized videos from the recent Forrester consumer forum conference in Chicago are now up. The videos are choppy (update: go for the high speed options for best viewing, it should stream smoothly) , but the content is what to focus on, so turn ’em on and listen, and glance at the slides while you multi-task. Richard Edelman was insightful from the top of the mountain, Christie Hefner delivered powerful examples of virtual worlds and social networks, Christina Norman of MTV pushed energy into her polished presentation. The Zefrank, Jeremy Allaire, and Pud panel is the most entertaining, but if you’re thinking of implementing a social media strategy, listen to Charlene’s presentation followed by Josh. I love blogged the event, … Continue readingVideos of Consumer Forum: Richard Edelman, Christie Hefner (Playboy), Christina Norman CMO of MTV, Ze Frank, Charlene Li, Josh Bernoff, Henry Jenkins and Pud!

Web Theory: How the Social Graph could be implemented from a Browser

Summary The need for a social graph is very clear as social networking features will be present on nearly every website. Because of it’s pervasive nature, I assert that the browser should be considered as a tool to display and render a social graph regardless of what site you visit. Situation: Social networks features to be ubiquitous What’s the problem? Social Networking is a feature of a website, and may happen to every site. Pain: Managing friends and networks is inefficient We’re tired of adding new friends and existing friends to each website that we join. Because of the sheer minutia of the task, we may inadvertently forget to add friends from one network to the next. Enter the Social … Continue readingWeb Theory: How the Social Graph could be implemented from a Browser

Utterz: Mobile Audio MicroMedia, is blogging old and slow?

I just created my first utter, a new mobile web service. What is it? yet another form of MicroMedia (a phrase that I coined, and it’s taking off, see Steve Rubel and Scoble). What is Utterz? An audio version of Twitter. Here’s how I did it (with a time breakdown): 1) I went to their site and registered (2 minutes) 2) Dialed the phone number, listened to greeting messages (1 minute) 3) Recorded it, reviewed it (and took a second cut) and confirmed (2 minutes) 4) Saved the number to my phone so I can use it again (15 seconds) 5) Refreshed website and was amazed to see it was instantly there. (30 seconds) 6) embedded on blog and wrote … Continue readingUtterz: Mobile Audio MicroMedia, is blogging old and slow?

WSJ’s Kara Swisher joins the conversation, how will traditional media adopt the live web?

I’m becoming a fan of Kara Swisher, who writes Boomtown. She’s a case study of how traditional newspapers (Wall Street Journal) have embraced social media. I see a lot of other newspapers who use blogs and podcasts and rss, yet they don’t really engage and be part of the experience of social media –they just report on it. It’s more than being an embedded reporter, she’s interacting with the ecosystem, I’ve been noticing this more and more. Kara’s blog posts are punchy and stir up the issues, her videos irreverent, she keeps them fast, brings us the experience and pushes her interviewers with challenging, and sometimes almost leading questions. In many ways she’s picking up on Scoble’s beat, by bringing … Continue readingWSJ’s Kara Swisher joins the conversation, how will traditional media adopt the live web?