Crisis Planning: Prepare Your Company For Social Media Attacks

In case you haven’t been watching, Nestle’s Facebook Fan page has been overrun by critics around deforestation, sustainability and poor social media relations. While this isn’t the place to have a discussion on sustainability, let’s look at the ramifications this has to society, brands, fans, and Facebook.

I spent a few hours reading and researching, it looks like members of Greenpeace launched an online protest, (read the initial report, then news here, here, here) spurring a groundswell of online criticism, a majority of it on their Facebook fan page.  (Update: It’s clear that Greenpeace helped in part organize this social attack, see hereherehere, and this timeline of events) Nestle’ responded defensively,  threatening to remove off-brand logos from it’s Facebook page resulting in a flurry of negative comments. It’s not totally clear if Greenpeace staged and executed the whole attack, but regardless, the community is relentlessly dog piling on the brand’s Facebook page.  While Nestle’ responded with a Q&A on their corporate site, it appears Nestle’ has retreated from the discussion –leaving the page open for detractors.

Brands are Unprepared for Organized Social Attacks
I’m not hear to pile on and criticize either parties, but I’d like to take a look at the ramifications and make pragmatic suggestions to be prepared. The last few days has taught us that:

  • While every company has critics, they can now organize a coordinated attack. Every company I work with has some degree of critics, it’s a natural state of the market.  Now, these critics may start to organize globally by using similar tools and technologies brands are to market themselves.   Expect coordinated and organized attacks from critics.
  • Facebook fan page brand-jacking is the new form of tree hugging. As movements form, the organized groups can stage mass attacks on brand Facebook fan pages, overrunning it with negative messages.  Like sitting in trees with banners to slow down clear cutting and spray paining messages on buildings, this is simply the digital form of real-world protest.  Expect more of this in the future –not less.  (Update: interesting perspective on “social media warfare“)
  • Ownership isn’t clear –yet the power belongs to community. The brands think they own the Facebook fan pages, but the fans can demonstrate power and take over ownership.  When you look closely, neither parties ‘owns’ the property, it belongs to Facebook –but don’t expect them to do much, brands are really on their own.

Recommendations: Develop a Community Strategy and Practice Crises Response
Don’t be scared. Instead, develop a plan, resources, and a crises response plan now.  It’s important you do this before it happens, rather than wait for the incident to occur.

  • Companies must have a community strategy –don’t jump without a parachute. Companies (and their agencies) are allured to adopt the latest tools like Facebook pages without thinking it through.  Don’t go without a clear set of policies, roles, and experienced staff, approach your Facebook fan page as you would opening a real-world store –don’t relegate management to a PR intern.   Unlike traditional advertising or email marketing, this is an ongoing relationship, so budget the right set of resources, monies, and programs for this long term effort.
  • Hire seasoned community managers –don’t relegate to PR intern. I know many companies that are throwing the Facebook fan page to the junior intern as they ‘get social media’ because they are Gen Y.  Change your mindset: think of your Facebook fan page as your physical store. Would you anoint a freshly minted student to run that physical store?   Instead, hire an experienced community manager that knows how to deal with angry members, foster relationships with advocates, and handle crises without breaking a sweat.
  • Plan and practice for the worse –yet live for the best. Companies should expect a full scale organized attack from critics.  One that will simultaneously overrun blog comments, Facebook fan pages, and an onslaught of blogs resulting in mainstream press appeal.  Start by developing a social media crises plan and developing internal fire drills to anticipate what would happen.  This doesn’t mean you should live your social efforts in fear, but instead, forge key relationships with members now that will defend your brand in the long run.  The goal?  To stay off this list of brands that got punk’d.

Love to hear your thoughts from this, what should companies do to be prepared for a social assault?

Whiteboard War Room Analysis: Nestle’ vs Greenpeace
Whiteboard War Room Analysis: Nestle' vs Greenpeace Social Warfare
Update March 24th, a few days later. We’ve done a white board analysis breaking down exactly what went wrong and providing actionable recommendations on what brands should do. Also see Susan Etlinger’s share of voice analysis, yet Howlett suggests this doesn’t impact share prices Also read Ben Kiker’s suggestions

397 Replies to “Crisis Planning: Prepare Your Company For Social Media Attacks”

  1. Great thoughts here, J. I really liked the part about “everyone has critics, it's the nature of the market” because its true. Not only do you need those who are experienced in general public relations, marketing and social media, but someone who has a firm grasp on crisis comm plans and execution. This shows understanding of roles and working as a team.

    I've been in one crisis communication situation (I worked for Mensa, the Holocaust Museum shooter was an ex-Mensa member, 500 media calls, 1,000+ mentions) and the thing is: you can only be so prepared. You have to go on instincts and understand the platforms and community you are talking to. If you dont? You flounder. New media tactics are different from marketing because of instant communication. Evaluate the message before sending it out – concise v. timely unfortunately has to play a role. Even saying “Hey, we are looking into this” provides acknowledgement.

    I could see the fluster unfold on this Facebook fan page, and hopefully they learn from it.

  2. Great thoughts here, J. I really liked the part about “everyone has critics, it's the nature of the market” because its true. Not only do you need those who are experienced in general public relations, marketing and social media, but someone who has a firm grasp on crisis comm plans and execution. This shows understanding of roles and working as a team.

    I've been in one crisis communication situation (I worked for Mensa, the Holocaust Museum shooter was an ex-Mensa member, 500 media calls, 1,000+ mentions) and the thing is: you can only be so prepared. You have to go on instincts and understand the platforms and community you are talking to. If you dont? You flounder. New media tactics are different from marketing because of instant communication. Evaluate the message before sending it out – concise v. timely unfortunately has to play a role. Even saying “Hey, we are looking into this” provides acknowledgement.

    I could see the fluster unfold on this Facebook fan page, and hopefully they learn from it.

    Lauren

  3. Great read! Best thing to remember = “everyone has critics, and now they can organize.” Isn't that the best/worst thing about using social media for marketing? People can organize themselves to be brand ambassadors/digital cheerleaders for your company – or they form a virtual picket line and tear you apart. Like you said, it's best to hire someone *experienced* to handle both situations.

  4. Great read! Best thing to remember = “everyone has critics, and now they can organize.” Isn't that the best/worst thing about using social media for marketing? People can organize themselves to be brand ambassadors/digital cheerleaders for your company – or they form a virtual picket line and tear you apart. Like you said, it's best to hire someone *experienced* to handle both situations.

  5. Great article, but I am willing to suggest that this “brand jacking” is more a “Brand Defacing” in Social Media, and not the same as tree hugging. Whereas tree hugging is mostly a passive action, brand defacing is a more aggressive action.

    Because what if this “brand jacking” happens to a non profit organization? Maybe started because of the salary that the CEO receives. Aren't “The tree huggers, tree hugging a tree hugging organization” at that point?

  6. Great article, but I am willing to suggest that this “brand jacking” is more a “Brand Defacing” in Social Media, and not the same as tree hugging. Whereas tree hugging is mostly a passive action, brand defacing is a more aggressive action. (And since brands are more and more what people say it is, instead of what they say they are, Identity Vs. Image..)

    Because what if this “brand jacking” happens to a non profit organization? Maybe started because of the salary that the CEO receives. Aren't “The tree huggers, tree hugging a tree hugging organization” at that point?

  7. Nice post here summarizing the issues, Jeremiah. A couple of points I'd like to add:

    * A PR Week story from February 2010 (http://budurl.com/MonitoringNestle) indicated that Nestle was searching for an agency to “handle its worldwide 'buzz' monitoring.” This decision appears to have stemmed from serious criticism the company received after inviting a group of mommy bloggers on an “all-expenses meeting with its CEO.” This at least indicates that Nestle understands it needs help navigating monitoring–and responding to–mentions and discussions in social media.

    * The initial response from Nestle on its Facebook Page served to antagonize the protesters even further. Of note:
    1) Even though tensions were running high, Nestle threatened to remove comments from users “using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic.”
    2) Nestle resorted to sarcasm and defensiveness when responding to some of the initial negative comments. Examples: “Thanks for the lesson in manners. Consider yourself embraced. But it's our page, we set the rules, it was ever thus.” The tone appears to have softened in later comments from the Nestle admin, but the damage was done.

    Effective community management and moderation really can make the difference over whether online communities and discussions spiral *completely* out of control. As you point out, Jeremiah, community management simply *cannot* be an afterthought.

    Bryan Person | LiveWorld

  8. Nice post here summarizing the issues, Jeremiah. A couple of points I'd like to add:

    * A PR Week story from February 2010 (http://budurl.com/MonitoringNestle) indicated that Nestle was searching for an agency to “handle its worldwide 'buzz' monitoring.” This decision appears to have stemmed from serious criticism the company received after inviting a group of mommy bloggers on an “all-expenses meeting with its CEO.” This at least indicates that Nestle understands it needs help navigating monitoring–and responding to–mentions and discussions in social media.

    * The initial response from Nestle on its Facebook Page served to antagonize the protesters even further. Of note:
    1) Even though tensions were running high, Nestle threatened to remove comments from users “using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic.”
    2) Nestle resorted to sarcasm and defensiveness when responding to some of the initial negative comments. Examples: “Thanks for the lesson in manners. Consider yourself embraced. But it's our page, we set the rules, it was ever thus.” The tone appears to have softened in later comments from the Nestle admin, but the damage was done.

    Effective community management and moderation really can make the difference over whether online communities and discussions spiral *completely* out of control. As you point out, Jeremiah, community management simply *cannot* be an afterthought.

    Bryan Person | LiveWorld

  9. “You can only be so prepared”. Absolutely. How can you prepare for the totally unexpected. And what if the company just knows the critics are completely right? But the corporation chose not to act for financial or political reasons? Social media are forcing companies to clean up their act and move their standards up. It might be painful for some corporations but everyone will eventually benefit if the critics are well documented and go beyond the mere personal opinion. Social media makes the the old paradigm of “Divide and conquer” obsolete. In this new social reality we are all part of the same web and it cannot be broken into pieces. United the consumers are more powerful than ever.

  10. “You can only be so prepared”. Absolutely. How can you prepare for the totally unexpected. And what if the company just knows the critics are completely right? But the corporation chose not to act for financial or political reasons? Social media are forcing companies to clean up their act and move their standards up. It might be painful for some corporations but everyone will eventually benefit if the critics are well documented and go beyond the mere personal opinion. Social media makes the the old paradigm of “Divide and conquer” obsolete. In this new social reality we are all part of the same web and it cannot be broken into pieces. United the consumers are more powerful than ever.

  11. I do, Dennis. I think that would only fan the flames even more. But if I were Nestle, I would change the Wall filters so that posts by “just Nestle” would appear by default. As part of this, Nestle needs to create posts more regularly. As the controversy has raged, Nestle hasn't made a new post since early Friday afternoon. Some 66 hours of silence doesn't help matters.

  12. I do, Dennis. I think that would only fan the flames even more. But if I were Nestle, I would change the Wall filters so that posts by “just Nestle” would appear by default. As part of this, Nestle needs to create posts more regularly. As the controversy has raged, Nestle hasn't made a new post since early Friday afternoon. Some 66 hours of silence doesn't help matters.

  13. This is a professional situation (online communities) brands must hire professionals.

    Can you tell me more why nestle' was criticized for having a sponsored meeting with mom bloggers? Walmart has done this in the past, why is this unique?

  14. This is a professional situation (online communities) brands must hire professionals.

    Can you tell me more why nestle' was criticized for having a sponsored meeting with mom bloggers? Walmart has done this in the past, why is this unique?

  15. I can see it going both ways

    1) Go silent, allow negative content to continue: Results: Continued backlash, sense of 'control' completely gone, difficult to recover

    2) Lock down the Facebook fan page for pro-nestle content only. Results: Conversation shifts elsewhere, if not louder.

    3) Disable the page completely. Either delete the page, remove all comments (pro and negative). Results: conversation shifts elsewhere, Nestle' appears standoffish.

  16. I can see it going a number of ways:

    1) Go silent, allow negative content to continue: Results: Continued backlash, sense of 'control' completely gone, difficult to recover

    2) Lock down the Facebook fan page for pro-nestle content only. Results: Conversation shifts elsewhere, if not louder.

    3) Disable the page completely. Either delete the page, remove all comments (pro and negative). Results: conversation shifts elsewhere, Nestle' appears standoffish.

    In each of these scenarios, Nestle' has few options.

  17. Jeremiah: I was just writing what I read in that PR week story, that Nestle was stung by criticism of its approach to reaching out to bloggers. It's pretty clear that Nestle (like Walmart) has a big group of detractors that will bash *whatever* the company does. My sense is that that is what happened last October. The story doesn't detail the specific opposition to Nestle's approach.

    But I think the bottom line is that Nestle came away realizing it needs an outside agency to help it navigate social media–both on the monitoring side and with engagement.

  18. Jeremiah: I was just writing what I read in that PR week story, that Nestle was stung by criticism of its approach to reaching out to bloggers. It's pretty clear that Nestle (like Walmart) has a big group of detractors that will bash *whatever* the company does. My sense is that that is what happened last October. The story doesn't detail the specific opposition to Nestle's approach.

    But I think the bottom line is that Nestle came away realizing it needs an outside agency to help it navigate social media–both on the monitoring side and with engagement.

  19. Thanks for the context, I read the article.

    Walmart was under heavy heavy fire for quite a while. It appears their 11 Moms program is working well as they allow the conversation on their corporate site. Advocacy programs are key (A theme I've been ringing for the last few months) for both marketing support, improving trust, and developing a defensive army of volunteers.

  20. Thanks for the context, I read the article.

    Walmart was under heavy heavy fire for quite a while. It appears their 11 Moms program is working well as they allow the conversation on their corporate site. Advocacy programs are key (A theme I've been ringing for the last few months) for both marketing support, improving trust, and developing a defensive army of volunteers.

  21. As a company, I think Nestle has to accept the fact that a percentage of people will chose to despise it, but I'm not sure they should be required to host the hate party.

    Allowing constructive dissent is one thing, but when comments are clearly hateful and contain NSFW language (and the “protesters” are discussing the company stock price activity), it seems the brand would be justified shutting that part of the debate off and welcoming the fact that it would go elsewhere – where people can discredit themselves.

  22. As a company, I think Nestle has to accept the fact that a percentage of people will chose to despise it, but I'm not sure they should be required to host the hate party.

    Allowing constructive dissent is one thing, but when comments are clearly hateful and contain NSFW language (and the “protesters” are discussing the company stock price activity), it seems the brand would be justified shutting that part of the debate off and welcoming the fact that it would go elsewhere – where people can discredit themselves.

  23. J, great timely post. Tough balancing act to be authentic and engage even with detractors – but if “tree huggers” wreck the experience for other users/fans that doesn't seem right either. What about the idea of disabling your Wall comments, but installing a custom app on your page that enables comment moderation? Your thoughts on this approach?

    Kevin

  24. J, great timely post. Tough balancing act to be authentic and engage even with detractors – but if “tree huggers” wreck the experience for other users/fans that doesn't seem right either. What about the idea of disabling your Wall comments, but installing a custom app on your page that enables comment moderation? Your thoughts on this approach?

    Kevin

  25. The Nestle situation was a great example of a company not understanding the subtly and seniority required to oversee the online conversation. The way the community manager interacted from a tone perspective was so clueless as to make the entire issue look like a hoax (sadly it's not appearing to be one but it had a very surreal quality to it).

    It's hard to know where to start critiquing this situation but clearly some war gaming of possible community management scenarios with their internal teams would have been extremely helpful. The issue that initially arose and the reaction/escalation was not hard to predict given the initial tone. It definitely reinforces the point that HOW you say something is as important as WHAT you say. I often point people to the video of JetBlue's ex-CEO and Domino's CEO apologies as an example. Same general content – completely different delivery… and it made a big difference.

  26. The Nestle situation was a great example of a company not understanding the subtly and seniority required to oversee the online conversation. The way the community manager interacted from a tone perspective was so clueless as to make the entire issue look like a hoax (sadly it's not appearing to be one but it had a very surreal quality to it).

    It's hard to know where to start critiquing this situation but clearly some war gaming of possible community management scenarios with their internal teams would have been extremely helpful. The issue that initially arose and the reaction/escalation was not hard to predict given the initial tone. It definitely reinforces the point that HOW you say something is as important as WHAT you say. I often point people to the video of JetBlue's ex-CEO and Domino's CEO apologies as an example. Same general content – completely different delivery… and it made a big difference.

  27. Hi Jeremiah,

    We're likely to see much more of this because many companies don't have good systems for screening out immature hot heads or folks with poor manners. I don't think being a “seasoned” community manager has much to do with it. And unfortunately, companies place as much value in community managers as they do with their other public facing staff. The brand face in retail or customer service is almost always someone who doesn't hold the rank of manager. By the time a manager is brought in, damage control is the order of the day.

  28. Hi Jeremiah,

    We're likely to see much more of this because many companies don't have good systems for screening out immature hot heads or folks with poor manners. I don't think being a “seasoned” community manager has much to do with it. And unfortunately, companies place as much value in community managers as they do with their other public facing staff. The brand face in retail or customer service is almost always someone who doesn't hold the rank of manager. By the time a manager is brought in, damage control is the order of the day.

  29. @Dennis: I would suggest a sound moderation policy could help in this situation. The brand needs to state in very clear language what kind of content and commentary is–and is not–acceptable on its Page. For example: “We welcome comments expressing all points of views on an issue–positive and negative–but reserve the right to remove posts that contain inappropriate language, hate speech, personal attacks, are wildly off-topic, etc.” Without such “rules of engagement,” it's hard for a brand or community host to remove any posts without being seen as an oversensitive censor!

  30. @Dennis: I would suggest a sound moderation policy could help in this situation. The brand needs to state in very clear language what kind of content and commentary is–and is not–acceptable on its Page. For example: “We welcome comments expressing all points of views on an issue–positive and negative–but reserve the right to remove posts that contain inappropriate language, hate speech, personal attacks, are wildly off-topic, etc.” Without such “rules of engagement,” it's hard for a brand or community host to remove any posts without being seen as an oversensitive censor!

  31. An extremely interesting article! Thanks Jeremiah, that's fantastic!

    I particularly like your point “Facebook fan page brand jacking is the new form of tree hugging”, it couldn't be more true. This is simply digital activism! I recently wrote an article particularly addressing this point, please feel free to have a read and leave your own comments: http://bit.ly/a1j4Ex

    Thanks again, for a very interesting read,
    This highlights the fact that company's need to think twice before using Social Media! If they're going to do it, they need to it properly, strategically and with resources in place!

    Cheers.
    Jon 😀

  32. An extremely interesting article! Thanks Jeremiah, that's fantastic!

    I particularly like your point “Facebook fan page brand jacking is the new form of tree hugging”, it couldn't be more true. This is simply digital activism! I recently wrote an article particularly addressing this point, please feel free to have a read and leave your own comments: http://bit.ly/a1j4Ex

    Thanks again, for a very interesting read,
    This highlights the fact that company's need to think twice before using Social Media! If they're going to do it, they need to it properly, strategically and with resources in place!

    Cheers.
    Jon 😀

  33. I noticed the same thing on the Seaworld Facebook fan page last month, after the death of one of its trainers. Detractors had hijacked the page and it seemed that Seaworld's policy was to let animal advocates voice their criticisms openly there. When you go visit the page today, http://www.facebook.com/SeaWorld, you don't see any of those detractors. Appears that the groundswell has subsided at least for now. Perhaps it's not wise to engage detractors directly, but Nestle, and other brands in similar positions, at least have a platform to educate their most vociferous critics.

  34. I noticed the same thing on the Seaworld Facebook fan page last month, after the death of one of its trainers. Detractors had hijacked the page and it seemed that Seaworld's policy was to let animal advocates voice their criticisms openly there. When you go visit the page today, http://www.facebook.com/SeaWorld, you don't see any of those detractors. Appears that the groundswell has subsided at least for now. Perhaps it's not wise to engage detractors directly, but Nestle, and other brands in similar positions, at least have a platform to educate their most vociferous critics.

  35. Thanks Christine, it always takes a few days and it'll boil over (I've been through it myself), the internet has a short period of rage, but a long term memory.

  36. Thanks Christine, it always takes a few days and it'll boil over (I've been through it myself), the internet has a short period of rage, but a long term memory.

  37. Agree completely–setting and meeting the consumers expectation (when possible) is vital right now. In addition, they need to provide an alternative form of contact as fans and customers need to know they have somewhere to voice there opinions and concerns no matter what they are or how passionately they are expressing them.

  38. Agree completely–setting and meeting the consumers expectation (when possible) is vital right now. In addition, they need to provide an alternative form of contact as fans and customers need to know they have somewhere to voice there opinions and concerns no matter what they are or how passionately they are expressing them.

  39. Agree completely–setting and meeting the consumers expectation (when possible) is vital right now. In addition, they need to provide an alternative form of contact as fans and customers need to know they have somewhere to voice there opinions and concerns no matter what they are or how passionately they are expressing them.

  40. Every system can be gamed, so a set of finite guidelines that can be enforced are key for every organization. The trick is however, to get the community to help create the guidelines –and enforce.

  41. Every system can be gamed, so a set of finite guidelines that can be enforced are key for every organization. The trick is however, to get the community to help create the guidelines –and enforce.

  42. From my own experience in social media an acceptance of critics seems obvious, however it falls to each individual company to handle the critics in a professional and appropriate manner.
    At the end of the day it will only last as long as it is fuelled.
    Interestedly for certain companies they may even benefit from bad press as well as good press.

  43. From my own experience in social media an acceptance of critics seems obvious, however it falls to each individual company to handle the critics in a professional and appropriate manner.
    At the end of the day it will only last as long as it is fuelled.
    Interestedly for certain companies they may even benefit from bad press as well as good press.

  44. This also shows that you can't wait until a crisis to engender goodwill in the online community. The bumps will be easier to handle if you are already there and engaging as a good corporate citizen.

  45. This also shows that you can't wait until a crisis to engender goodwill in the online community. The bumps will be easier to handle if you are already there and engaging as a good corporate citizen.

  46. Great point. Fairly commonplace practice on blogs, but you're right, we need to add this language to Facebook Pages, as well. I'm of the view that critical comments give a company the opportunity to clarify their position and state the facts. But commenters can go overboard, and that detracts from the online experience of other Fans. So, in that kind of situation, I can see where Page comment moderation would be warranted.

  47. Great point. Fairly commonplace practice on blogs, but you're right, we need to add this language to Facebook Pages, as well. I'm of the view that critical comments give a company the opportunity to clarify their position and state the facts. But commenters can go overboard, and that detracts from the online experience of other Fans. So, in that kind of situation, I can see where Page comment moderation would be warranted.

  48. Another thing companies can do is be more accountable and responsive when problems (environmental, consumer, labor, etc) are pointed out to them.

    A lot of the talk is about the PR response. But first and foremost it's the product that matters. (In this case the ingredients.)

    I like to think social media is making companies more responsive. Getting them better at listening, and doing something about things their customers care about. It would be a shame if the only lesson learned here by companies is that, “we need better internet PR people”.

    Note – I work for Greenpeace, but am not involved in the Nestle stuff. (I do web infrastructure projects these days.)

  49. Another thing companies can do is be more accountable and responsive when problems (environmental, consumer, labor, etc) are pointed out to them.

    A lot of the talk is about the PR response. But first and foremost it's the product that matters. (In this case the ingredients.)

    I like to think social media is making companies more responsive. Getting them better at listening, and doing something about things their customers care about. It would be a shame if the only lesson learned here by companies is that, “we need better internet PR people”.

    Note – I work for Greenpeace, but am not involved in the Nestle stuff. (I do web infrastructure projects these days.)

  50. Great article, although I disagree with hiring anyone from outside of the company to handle any social media work if it can be avoided. Instead a company should choose someone from inside the company who has a strong understanding of the brand and also as you said, can build relationships and be prepared to help put out the occasional fire.

    Can you do an article on the steps the Nestle, or any company, should have taken in that situation. It would be a tremendous help! =D

  51. Great article, although I disagree with hiring anyone from outside of the company to handle any social media work if it can be avoided. Instead a company should choose someone from inside the company who has a strong understanding of the brand and also as you said, can build relationships and be prepared to help put out the occasional fire.

    Can you do an article on the steps the Nestle, or any company, should have taken in that situation. It would be a tremendous help! =D

  52. Companies should develop social media policies that complement their strategy and include an escalation path to the appropriate people in the company that can make an informed decision on how to respond to negative criticisms. Companies should also very clearly spell out what is considered to be social media attacks versus critiques vs positive commentary and develop guidelines on how to handle each type of commentary.

    And Ultimately companies do need to show fans they are listening, while also making it clear what is acceptable and unacceptable. I'll be posting an extended response to this post next week.

  53. Companies should develop social media policies that complement their strategy and include an escalation path to the appropriate people in the company that can make an informed decision on how to respond to negative criticisms. Companies should also very clearly spell out what is considered to be social media attacks versus critiques vs positive commentary and develop guidelines on how to handle each type of commentary.

    And Ultimately companies do need to show fans they are listening, while also making it clear what is acceptable and unacceptable. I'll be posting an extended response to this post next week.

  54. Companies should develop social media policies that complement their strategy and include an escalation path to the appropriate people in the company that can make an informed decision on how to respond to negative criticisms. Companies should also very clearly spell out what is considered to be social media attacks versus critiques vs positive commentary and develop guidelines on how to handle each type of commentary.

    And Ultimately companies do need to show fans they are listening, while also making it clear what is acceptable and unacceptable. I'll be posting an extended response to this post next week.

  55. Great post, Jeremiah. I think you definitely have a point when you say companies should expect more, not less of these brand page defacing efforts from critics. Just recently, farmers took to Pilot Travel Centers' Facebook page to protest their donation to the Humane Society of the United States (http://bit.ly/dqBL5M), and the same group of self-described “agvocates” utilized YouTube, Facebook and Twitter when Yellow Tail Wine did the same thing (http://bit.ly/cCbIG7). In both cases, companies changed their practices.

    One of the key preparedness steps a company can take in the digital space is to set ground rules early – particularly on things like comment moderation. That's not to say comments like what Nestle is dealing with wouldn't appear (even if they did not allow comments on Facebook, critics would organize elsewhere), but setting guidelines on brand pages could help direct inquiries in a more productive fashion. For example, Nestle could begin discussing the issue in a designated forum where resources and materials (like that Q&A) can be found. Of course, the goal of many activist groups in this type of situation is not productive conversation, it's disruptive attention. Given that, Nestle needs to engage, but tread carefully in its response as it moves forward.

  56. Great post, Jeremiah. I think you definitely have a point when you say companies should expect more, not less of these brand page defacing efforts from critics. Just recently, farmers took to Pilot Travel Centers' Facebook page to protest their donation to the Humane Society of the United States (http://bit.ly/dqBL5M), and the same group of self-described “agvocates” utilized YouTube, Facebook and Twitter when Yellow Tail Wine did the same thing (http://bit.ly/cCbIG7). In both cases, companies changed their practices.

    One of the key preparedness steps a company can take in the digital space is to set ground rules early – particularly on things like comment moderation. That's not to say comments like what Nestle is dealing with wouldn't appear (even if they did not allow comments on Facebook, critics would organize elsewhere), but setting guidelines on brand pages could help direct inquiries in a more productive fashion. For example, Nestle could begin discussing the issue in a designated forum where resources and materials (like that Q&A) can be found. Of course, the goal of many activist groups in this type of situation is not productive conversation, it's disruptive attention. Given that, Nestle needs to engage, but tread carefully in its response as it moves forward.

  57. Although not taking sides it is clear that big corporations do not understand the shift that happened in the last couple of years. Consumers now have the same power as a billion dollar company and they don't hesitate to use this power to let companies know what they think. As one person on the Nestle's facebook page put it: “Thanks to facebook it is much easier to be an activist.” I believe that in the future all brands will feel more pressure to do the right thing by the same people that are paying for their products.

  58. Although not taking sides it is clear that big corporations do not understand the shift that happened in the last couple of years. Consumers now have the same power as a billion dollar company and they don't hesitate to use this power to let companies know what they think. As one person on the Nestle's facebook page put it: “Thanks to facebook it is much easier to be an activist.” I believe that in the future all brands will feel more pressure to do the right thing by the same people that are paying for their products.

  59. Hi Jeremiah, great post!

    Clearly Nestle have shot themselves in the foot. On all points they should never have embarked on a social media program without fully training staff on how to monitor, respond etc. Corporations are jumping into this arena without clearly thought out strategies on management nor recognizing that they must accept good and bad comments…

    Clearly the quick fire response gave the corporation no time to consider how best to manage. A few hours of research could have informed this person on some alternative responses. As some people have mentioned, turning a negative into a positive would have been by far the best approach.

    Every Nestle executive should be aware about the growing world concern over the consumption of Palm Oil. Acres of rainforest are being lost each day, as companies, cut, slash and burn to make way for more palm oil production. This is causing a huge environmental issue in Borneo/Indonesia where it is not only changing their climate but losing the unique habitat for orang utans and other rare species (and people who live in these forests). Orangutans and other animals/plans are thus facing extinction – in Sumatra it could be as soon as 2012-2015. A positive approach – such as other food manufacturers are choosing – is as follows.

    To stop buying palm oil and using alteratives – YES, it makes the product more expensive – consumers need to understand that. But if the majority of consumers are asking a food manufacturer to change their ingredients, it is a point of consideration which could be turned into a big positive for Nestle.

    Another approach, as is being led in the UK, is buying palm oil only from sustainable palm oil
    corporations. Palm Oil farms exist, so why not encourage those corporations to continue to grow on the SAME land and not go for the cheaper, easier option of forever using virgin land… In Australia a huge majority of school kids and parents lobbied their favourite food manufacturers to change their purchasing of palm oil. The companies listened (Nestle take note) and responded positively – a win win situation for all.

    This will surely become one of the main “how not to do social media” case studies for years to come – the orangutans plight may yet still win through.

  60. Hi Jeremiah, great post!

    Clearly Nestle have shot themselves in the foot. On all points they should never have embarked on a social media program without fully training staff on how to monitor, respond etc. Corporations are jumping into this arena without clearly thought out strategies on management nor recognizing that they must accept good and bad comments…

    Clearly the quick fire response gave the corporation no time to consider how best to manage. A few hours of research could have informed this person on some alternative responses. As some people have mentioned, turning a negative into a positive would have been by far the best approach.

    Every Nestle executive should be aware about the growing world concern over the consumption of Palm Oil. Acres of rainforest are being lost each day, as companies, cut, slash and burn to make way for more palm oil production. This is causing a huge environmental issue in Borneo/Indonesia where it is not only changing their climate but losing the unique habitat for orang utans and other rare species (and people who live in these forests). Orangutans and other animals/plans are thus facing extinction – in Sumatra it could be as soon as 2012-2015. A positive approach – such as other food manufacturers are choosing – is as follows.

    To stop buying palm oil and using alteratives – YES, it makes the product more expensive – consumers need to understand that. But if the majority of consumers are asking a food manufacturer to change their ingredients, it is a point of consideration which could be turned into a big positive for Nestle.

    Another approach, as is being led in the UK, is buying palm oil only from sustainable palm oil
    corporations. Palm Oil farms exist, so why not encourage those corporations to continue to grow on the SAME land and not go for the cheaper, easier option of forever using virgin land… In Australia a huge majority of school kids and parents lobbied their favourite food manufacturers to change their purchasing of palm oil. The companies listened (Nestle take note) and responded positively – a win win situation for all.

    This will surely become one of the main “how not to do social media” case studies for years to come – the orangutans plight may yet still win through.

  61. We work with a number of clients and develop emergency response or crisis plans for them that anticipate problems. The crisis plan provides everything from scripts to use with reporters to the preparations that need to occur in the event of a natural disaster. Now we’re realizing that we also need to prepare clients for digital forms of protest, too. You’re right – this is no job for a PR intern. Crisis planning requires a pro.

  62. We work with a number of clients and develop emergency response or crisis plans for them that anticipate problems. The crisis plan provides everything from scripts to use with reporters to the preparations that need to occur in the event of a natural disaster. Now we’re realizing that we also need to prepare clients for digital forms of protest, too. You’re right – this is no job for a PR intern. Crisis planning requires a pro.

  63. Interesting post. While I wouldn’t want to comment on a situation in which the full facts are unclear (disclaimer: Nestle is a sometime client of my employer), in our experience, and in addition to preparation, staff training, monitoring etc, crises increasingly require the following three critical capabilities & skills:

    1. Speed – in response
    2. Accuracy, and flexibility – in messaging and timing
    3. And, as always, most important – good judgment.

    Yrs,

    Charlie

  64. Interesting post. While I wouldn’t want to comment on a situation in which the full facts are unclear (disclaimer: Nestle is a sometime client of my employer), in our experience, and in addition to preparation, staff training, monitoring etc, crises increasingly require the following three critical capabilities & skills:

    1. Speed – in response
    2. Accuracy, and flexibility – in messaging and timing
    3. And, as always, most important – good judgment.

    Yrs,

    Charlie

  65. This reminds me of the days I was hanging out at “forums”. There were trolls that the forum administrators should watch out for and know how to handle. I cannot emphasize enough your point about hiring a seasoned community managers and not relegating it to PR intern. A wise community manager is very important to ensure that what happened to Nestle won't happen to them.

  66. This reminds me of the days I was hanging out at “forums”. There were trolls that the forum administrators should watch out for and know how to handle. I cannot emphasize enough your point about hiring a seasoned community managers and not relegating it to PR intern. A wise community manager is very important to ensure that what happened to Nestle won't happen to them.

  67. As you know I've been trying to piece these Nestle/Greenpeace puzzle pieces together, and the one that keeps jumping out at me (yet I'm still trying to confirm to what degree) is the notion of a “professional” response, delegation to interns, etc. It's incredibly important that the takeaway from your “Hire seasoned community managers – don't relegate to PR intern” be read very literally.

    As I've spoken with other thought leaders in the social media space many of them have left out the “community managers” part of that sentence, instead focusing on someone “higher up” in the organization vs someone less experienced. The problem with that is that from what I can tell it is the “higher up” in the Nestle situation who is the one primarily responsible for the inappropriate comments on the Facebook page. A “higher up” feels more empowered, and many times has a sense of “protecting” the community manager who is being “unfairly attacked” and thus jumps into the fray without a lot of thought or context. One might think a more experienced PR person would know better, in many instances that's just not the case.

    The kettle was already on the fire with the flame turned to high by the time the first “inappropriate” comment was made, and from my perspective the initial comment itself was relatively harmless…in a normal situation.

    Mob mentality is alive and well on the social internet, and the rules for instigating it are as they ever were. The term “social” is there for a reason, and social psychology definitely applies. And as I once told Dave Gray, the bandwagon doesn't care which side of a fight it is on, with the right sales pitch you can still fill it up.

  68. As you know I've been trying to piece these Nestle/Greenpeace puzzle pieces together, and the one that keeps jumping out at me (yet I'm still trying to confirm to what degree) is the notion of a “professional” response, delegation to interns, etc. It's incredibly important that the takeaway from your “Hire seasoned community managers – don't relegate to PR intern” be read very literally.

    As I've spoken with other thought leaders in the social media space many of them have left out the “community managers” part of that sentence, instead focusing on someone “higher up” in the organization vs someone less experienced. The problem with that is that from what I can tell it is the “higher up” in the Nestle situation who is the one primarily responsible for the inappropriate comments on the Facebook page. A “higher up” feels more empowered, and many times has a sense of “protecting” the community manager who is being “unfairly attacked” and thus jumps into the fray without a lot of thought or context. One might think a more experienced PR person would know better, in many instances that's just not the case. Lastly, an impact point that shouldn't be lost here is that social media is the ideal platform for any activist / loyalist group. Whereas a corporation needs to hire, manage, and mitigate using real dollars, an activist organization has volunteers en masse at its beck and call. The notion of creating brand advocates in the social media space would seem more urgent than ever, but even then will they ever fight as hard and ruthless as an organization like Greenpeace when it puts its laser focus on you?

    The kettle was already on the fire with the flame turned to high by the time the first “inappropriate” comment was made, and from my perspective the initial comment itself was relatively harmless…in a normal situation.

    Mob mentality is alive and well on the social internet, and the rules for instigating it are as they ever were. The term “social” is there for a reason, and social psychology definitely applies. And as I once told Dave Gray, the bandwagon doesn't care which side of a fight it is on, with the right sales pitch you can still fill it up.

  69. Jeremiah:

    Nice post – really interesting how Greenpeace is using SM as a tool. They don't only use it like this – in attack mode, but also to further their own interests.

    Greenpeace used SM to create a fake politician running for office in Turkey. This campaign got some 33 legislators to sign on to support his environmental positions during their own elections before it was revealed as a sham.

    Powerful tools.

    Tom O'Brien

  70. Jeremiah:

    Nice post – really interesting how Greenpeace is using SM as a tool. They don't only use it like this – in attack mode, but also to further their own interests.

    Greenpeace used SM to create a fake politician running for office in Turkey. This campaign got some 33 legislators to sign on to support his environmental positions during their own elections before it was revealed as a sham.

    Powerful tools.

    Tom O'Brien

  71. Take a look at 11 Moms – It looks to me like it was abandoned some time last summer. Interesting that they walked away from such a high profile program without so much as a “thanks for participating”

    TO'B

  72. Take a look at 11 Moms – It looks to me like it was abandoned some time last summer. Interesting that they walked away from such a high profile program without so much as a “thanks for participating”

    TO'B

  73. As Rohit Bhargava points out on his blog and on SocialMediaToday, part of the blame here has to go to whomever was in charge of monitoring Nestle's facebook page. Too often at big companies, the community management responsibility is left to junior and part-time employees. Monitoring and responding has to go up the food chain to risk and compliance, as well as senior management, particularly in the office of the CFO, not just marketing.

  74. As Rohit Bhargava points out on his blog and on SocialMediaToday, part of the blame here has to go to whomever was in charge of monitoring Nestle's facebook page. Too often at big companies, the community management responsibility is left to junior and part-time employees. Monitoring and responding has to go up the food chain to risk and compliance, as well as senior management, particularly in the office of the CFO, not just marketing.

  75. I'm just as interested in how Greenpeace organized this, um, engagement with a brand. Brilliant.

  76. I'm just as interested in how Greenpeace organized this, um, engagement with a brand. Brilliant.

  77. Jeremiah, Great point about not using PR interns. This type of thing needs to be handled by seasoned professionals, with a plan. There will be a number of business cases published over the next couple of years talking about how NOT to handle these type of social media attacks. And though shutting down the fan page is not a smart option, it will happen more than not.

  78. Jeremiah, Great point about not using PR interns. This type of thing needs to be handled by seasoned professionals, with a plan. There will be a number of business cases published over the next couple of years talking about how NOT to handle these type of social media attacks. And though shutting down the fan page is not a smart option, it will happen more than not.

  79. Companies should start listening to their customers and in case of 'social attack' (love the concept) should engage in a meaningful conversation with them.
    Drop the Top down mass marketing strategy, engage in transparency and start building trust

  80. Companies should start listening to their customers and in case of 'social attack' (love the concept) should engage in a meaningful conversation with them.
    Drop the Top down mass marketing strategy, engage in transparency and start building trust

  81. This is a topic that is coming up more and more frequently. It is important for brands to look at these things a bit more preemptively, rather than just focusing on what to do if/when a social attack happens. Obviously social media allows consumers to immediately amplify their likes and dislikes after an interaction with a brand, and the potential effect can be disastrous when an experience is not to the consumer’s liking. If brands want to ensure the user experience is meeting their customers’ expectations they should go straight to the source! This is especially true with social media strategies- social media allows brands to connect directly with consumers- companies can use public or private online communities to ask consumers about their preferences, listen to their feedback and apply it to their business. We are seeing many of clients use smaller private communities to help shape their larger, public social initiatives before they are launched to the general public, knowing that if not executed well, they could be faced with a mob of angry Tweeters.

  82. They had practice, they hammered Cadbury NZ before Nestle bought them out last year with the exact same method. They also used tradtional media dissuction and got cadbury to change the coholate recipe back to cocoa butter from palm oil. Huge imapct on sales and brand equity.

  83. They had practice, they hammered Cadbury NZ before Nestle bought them out last year with the exact same method. They also used tradtional media dissuction and got cadbury to change the coholate recipe back to cocoa butter from palm oil. Huge imapct on sales and brand equity.

  84. Jeremiah, Great summary and advice. I recently wrote an article for The Public Relations Strategist on “analzying commonly held beliefs about managing 2.0 crises.” If you're interested, a summary can be found on my blog (and the full article is also attached there): http://www.jamesjdonnelly.com/2010/03/analyzing

    I hope this helps add texture to your excellent thoughts on the whiteboard.

  85. Jeremiah, Great summary and advice. I recently wrote an article for The Public Relations Strategist on “analzying commonly held beliefs about managing 2.0 crises.” If you're interested, a summary can be found on my blog (and the full article is also attached there): http://www.jamesjdonnelly.com/2010/03/analyzing

    I hope this helps add texture to your excellent thoughts on the whiteboard.

  86. This has happened enough that you'd think a better plan would be in place for such a large corporation. Brand awareness and it's value is important so you think it would be guarded like some secret formula. This was plain when Ford used it's brand for loan security a few years ago. Perhaps many still don't take brand awareness seriously enough. http://bit.ly/cTaiys

  87. This has happened enough that you'd think a better plan would be in place for such a large corporation. Brand awareness and it's value is important so you think it would be guarded like some secret formula. This was plain when Ford used it's brand for loan security a few years ago. Perhaps many still don't take brand awareness seriously enough. http://bit.ly/cTaiys

  88. Brand awareness is something to treasure but sadly many businesses you think would know better lag behind. PR, marketing and advertising have not stayed ahead of the sea change as will as they should have in too many instances. Pity. http://bit.ly/cTaiys

  89. Brand awareness is something to treasure but sadly many businesses you think would know better lag behind. PR, marketing and advertising have not stayed ahead of the sea change as will as they should have in too many instances. Pity. http://bit.ly/cTaiys

  90. Even though most/all agree on the need for professional competence to handle a crisis, and that those people must be empowered to act quickly, as opposed to letting not so experienced PR / marketing / management run the show – this is just for the crisis handling. It's treating the symptom. The real task for management is less understanding social media, but more understanding that the underlying problem must be solved. However good crisis handling skills will not change the fact that consumers / visitors now have the power to influence the agenda for how companies shall behave. Example: If you import and sell clothes and it turns out that the manufacturing plants use child labour, no PR stunt will save you in the long run.
    Now is the time for management to focus more on doing the right thing than doing the cheapest thing. Good management will find ways to solve such challenges more cheaply before they are exposed than after.
    I think this aspect should be part of every short list for dealing with social media.

  91. Even though most/all agree on the need for professional competence to handle a crisis, and that those people must be empowered to act quickly, as opposed to letting not so experienced PR / marketing / management run the show – this is just for the crisis handling. It's treating the symptom. The real task for management is less understanding social media, but more understanding that the underlying problem must be solved. However good crisis handling skills will not change the fact that consumers / visitors now have the power to influence the agenda for how companies shall behave. Example: If you import and sell clothes and it turns out that the manufacturing plants use child labour, no PR stunt will save you in the long run.
    Now is the time for management to focus more on doing the right thing than doing the cheapest thing. Good management will find ways to solve such challenges more cheaply before they are exposed than after.
    I think this aspect should be part of every short list for dealing with social media.

  92. Yes, but act quickly executing against a plan.

    Anyone can act quickly, but having a crises response plan to allow anyone to act on a Friday night when the execs have gone home is key.

    We're in agreement: Companies must have a plan in place, esp for crises.

  93. Yes, but act quickly executing against a plan.

    Anyone can act quickly, but having a crises response plan to allow anyone to act on a Friday night when the execs have gone home is key.

    We're in agreement: Companies must have a plan in place, esp for crises.

  94. Great post, I think you've bought the points relative to the issue all together really well. I especially like your points about Facebook and management of social media when it comes to brands and PR.

  95. Great post, I think you've bought the points relative to the issue all together really well. I especially like your points about Facebook and management of social media when it comes to brands and PR.

  96. Thanks Jeremiah,

    Always is useful to read your comments. Everybody is awaiting the Nestle's answer… (tic tac…tic tac)

    The time will show us best practices to face up these Social Media attacks.

  97. Thanks Jeremiah,

    Always is useful to read your comments. Everybody is awaiting the Nestle's answer… (tic tac…tic tac)

    The time will show us best practices to face up these Social Media attacks.

  98. Great post Jeremiah, thanks for sharing. I could not agree more with all of your recommendations.

    It sure is surprising to me, but the idea of planning for 1 of these social media attacks seems to be so foreign to some folks.

    If you aren't into planning and just want to know how to respond when it happens, check out this post “The top 10 ways to respond to your next social media attack” – http://bit.ly/cYMQm0

    @keithbilous | ICUC Moderation Services Inc.

  99. Great post Jeremiah, thanks for sharing. I could not agree more with all of your recommendations.

    It sure is surprising to me, but the idea of planning for 1 of these social media attacks seems to be so foreign to some folks.

    If you aren't into planning and just want to know how to respond when it happens, check out this post “The top 10 ways to respond to your next social media attack” – http://bit.ly/cYMQm0

    @keithbilous | ICUC Moderation Services Inc.

  100. This is a good post, with helpful info, but your misuse of crisis/crises detracts from its credibility.

    It's Crisis Planning, not Crises Planning.

    Like Tax Planning, not Taxes Planning.

  101. This is a good post, with helpful info, but your misuse of crisis/crises detracts from its credibility.

    It's Crisis Planning, not Crises Planning.

    Like Tax Planning, not Taxes Planning.

  102. I apologize… it came out much bitchier than I intended. I still had my editor hat on from work and should not have hit “post.” Can we rewind?

    What I meant to say was: I appreciate this post because we recently had (very minor) social media crisis and it's a terrible feeling to have to guess how best to react in the heat of the moment. This will be helpful for future reference.

  103. I apologize… it came out much bitchier than I intended. I still had my editor hat on from work and should not have hit “post.” Can we rewind?

    What I meant to say was: I appreciate this post because we recently had (very minor) social media crisis and it's a terrible feeling to have to guess how best to react in the heat of the moment. This will be helpful for future reference.

  104. I am a partner in a health care marketing agency, and a lot of doctors, hospitals and marketers are smitten with the social media bug. While I personally love social media, I argue in my recent blog post (http://bit.ly/cEZttl) that not everyone should have a Facebook fan page, especially do-it-yourselfers or people who WILL throw the function to an 20-something intern. It can be great, but it can blow up too, and not everyone is set up to deal with that.

  105. I am a partner in a health care marketing agency, and a lot of doctors, hospitals and marketers are smitten with the social media bug. While I personally love social media, I argue in my recent blog post (http://bit.ly/cEZttl) that not everyone should have a Facebook fan page, especially do-it-yourselfers or people who WILL throw the function to an 20-something intern. It can be great, but it can blow up too, and not everyone is set up to deal with that.

  106. Is it possible to de-fan someone? What's wrong with making a public statement addressing the issue at hand, and then deleting all the malicious comments and de-fanning them (if that's even possible)?

  107. Is it possible to de-fan someone? What's wrong with making a public statement addressing the issue at hand, and then deleting all the malicious comments and de-fanning them (if that's even possible)?

  108. This is a really study of the Greenpeace vs. Nestle issues. I don't think its over yet. I look this morning and there are still plenty of wall posts on the Nestle fan page calling out against Nestle. I always feel bad for the companies that teach us through their bad experiences. I'm thinking of Domino's Pizza and United to name a few.

    The reality is that most brands on social networks are not going to experience the same level of negative events, but your recommendations still hold true for all brands. Some really good advice here.

    Thanks for sharing.

  109. This is a really study of the Greenpeace vs. Nestle issues. I don't think its over yet. I looked this morning and there are still plenty of wall posts on the Nestle fan page calling out against Nestle. I always feel bad for the companies that teach us through their bad experiences. I'm thinking of Domino's Pizza and United to name a few.

    The reality is that most brands on social networks are not going to experience the same level of negative events, but your recommendations still hold true for all brands. Some really good advice here.

    Thanks for sharing.

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  117. The web being a free space has been exhausted my much people to voice out their opinion, even angst, even protests. Maybe creators of corporate website designs or ecommerce web site designs and even social networking designs out there who aimed at social networking development and better online connections must not leave this kind of issue unattended. Maybe they should work for a page where a forum could be held. I'm having my own advice applied on my own corporate web design that I'm making if ever circumstances like this arises, a business site that it would be.

  118. The web being a free space has been exhausted my much people to voice out their opinion, even angst, even protests. Maybe creators of corporate website designs or ecommerce web site designs and even social networking designs out there who aimed at social networking development and better online connections must not leave this kind of issue unattended. Maybe they should work for a page where a forum could be held. I'm having my own advice applied on my own corporate web design that I'm making if ever circumstances like this arises, a business site that it would be.

  119. The web, being a free space, has been exhausted my much people to voice out their opinion and even angst. I think it would be good if creators of corporate website designs or ecommerce web site designs and even social networking designs out there who aimed at social networking development and better online connections must not leave this kind of issue unattended. Maybe they should work for a page where a forum could be held. I'm having my own advice applied on my own corporate web design. I might encounter the same thing as Nestle.

  120. The web, being a free space, has been exhausted my much people to voice out their opinion and even angst. I think it would be good if creators of corporate website designs or ecommerce web site designs and even social networking designs out there who aimed at social networking development and better online connections must not leave this kind of issue unattended. Maybe they should work for a page where a forum could be held. I'm having my own advice applied on my own corporate web design. I might encounter the same thing as Nestle.

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  122. Effective community management and moderation really can make the difference over whether online communities and discussions spiral *completely* out of control. As you point out, Jeremiah, community management simply *cannot* be an afterthought.

  123. “Well , the view of the passage is totally correct ,your details is really reasonable and you guy give us valuable informative post, I totally agree the standpoint of upstairs. I often surfing on this forum when I m free and I find there are so much good information we can learn in this forum!

  124. Jeremiah, What are your thoughts about companies responding to negative comments written about them? For example, when a company is going through a crisis situation and articles are written about them and posted online. When there are negative comments posted about the company (that might or might not be correct) do you believe it's in the company's best interest to respond to the post — possibly to direct readers to their website where they've posted the real information? (By the way, I'm asking the question in general not related to Nestle or any other specific company.) Looking forward to your response.

  125. Very interesting and informative post. However when it comes to crises response, where I'm from (Malaysia), it's still primarily focused on the mass media rather than electronic means. I guess we're nowhere there yet.

  126. The presentation is so good as will try to make efforts on it to follow as well also do let know this to my well wishers . Thanks a lot for this informative writeup.

  127. Although not taking sides it is clear that big corporations do not understand the shift that happened in the last couple of years. Consumers now have the same power as a billion dollar company and they don’t hesitate to use this power to let companies know what they think. As one person on the Nestle’s facebook page put it: “Thanks to facebook it is much easier to be an activist.” I believe that in the future all brands will feel more pressure to do the right thing by the same people that are paying for their products.

  128. The presentation is so good as will try to make efforts on it to follow as well also do let know this to my well wishers . Thanks a lot for this informative writeup.

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  137. Perhaps it’s not wise to engage detractors directly, but Nestle, and other brands in similar positions, at least have a platform to educate their most vociferous critics.

  138. I read your article and its very good! I enjoy reading it because I found interesting information.Thanks!

  139. Thanks For Sharing .But I am not agree with all your recommendations . The abstraction of planning for 1 of these amusing media attacks seems to be so adopted to some folks. I Think brand jacking is more a brand defacing in social media, and not the same as tree hugging.       
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  140. Very good point! Now how about a plan? Do not give it to an Intern is not a plan. An outline or check sheet for companies to create a Plan.

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  148. Great stuff – but can you tell me which one do you use – I like the way you have it

  149. I know this is an old post, but just wanted to reply – the 11 moms is still going strong – they have just changed their names to the Walmart Moms – since there are more than 11 of them. 

  150. If you have the unfortunate experience of having an intruder hack any one of your social platforms, and if the hacker begins to use that account as if it’s their own, probably attempting to spread rumors or stir up havoc for your brand, well, there’s no sooner time then immediately to respond to this type of crisis.

  151. Thanks for the post. When discussing Social Media strategy, it is always a scary thing to give a voice to the consumers, but certainly necessary in today’s interactive culture.

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